Do you remember how the American people were told to trust the Administration that things would work out with Obamacare? That our concerns about care and cost were overblown?

Well, Philip Klein over at The Washington Examiner has a reminder that not only were We the People right in 2009 and 2010, we continue to be right, even as supporters of the law claim it’ll work:

From the time that the health care law was first making its way through Congress, Democrats have consistently dismissed reasonable criticisms of the law, only to see critics later vindicated by events. Time and again, the administration has had to acknowledge that many provisions of the law – minor and major — are unworkable.

Klein’s piece is worth reading in full, but here is the list of key areas on which we were right, and Obamacare backers were wrong:

  • The CLASS Act was not affordable, and the Administration was forced to admit it before abandoning the Act
  • In April 2013, the Administration delayed a small business provision because it couldn’t execute the legislation.
  • In May, the Administration desperately tried to salvage a provision to cover those with pre-existing conditions, despite being over-budget and under-coverage.
  • The July delay of the employer mandate was due to business complaints about cost, as opponents of the law predicted.
  • The Administration admitted this month that operational challenges to implement federal subsidies have proven to be too much, so the “honor system” will be used to accommodate implementation.
  • Klein cites the Associated Press from Tuesday, noting “the administration has quietly notified insurers that a computer system problem will limit penalties that the law says the companies may charge smokers.”

When pundits across the political spectrum are agreeing with the Tea Party, the ammunition against big government grows exponentially. Klein’s list is powerful ammunition and his closing doesn’t disappoint:

The administration and its allies have spent years attacking opponents of Obamacare as uninformed bumpkins for suggesting that the law was unworkable. They should have been listening instead.

Can you hear us now?